Saturday, 29 September 2018

Sloan Kettering Executive Turns Over Windfall Stake in Biotech Start-Up

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By KATIE THOMAS and CHARLES ORNSTEIN from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2xOKzCv

Boy Who Was Tongue-Tied Speaks for First Time

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By STORYFUL from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2xMm1dr

Friday, 28 September 2018

Ebola Likely to Spread From Congo to Uganda, W.H.O. Says

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By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2NKYQKx

In the Nursing Home, Empty Beds and Quiet Halls

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By PAULA SPAN from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2DFhTBk

Thursday, 27 September 2018

Not All Women Have a Clear Answer for How Sexual Assault Affected Them. That Doesn’t Mean It Had No Effect.

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By HEATHER MURPHY from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2R5SBz5
Not All Women Have a Clear Answer for How Sexual Assault Affected Them. That Doesn’t Mean It Had No Effect.

Wednesday, 26 September 2018

In Rare Bipartisan Accord, House and Senate Reach Compromise on Opioid Bill

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By ABBY GOODNOUGH from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2OdztjU

Tuesday, 25 September 2018

Cancer Center Switches Focus on Fund-Raising as Problems Mount

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Cancer Center
This article was reportable and written during a collaboration with ProPublica, the noncommercial journalism organization.

Memorial Sloan applied scientist Cancer Center has suddenly modified the main target of AN annual drive amid a widening crisis that has already crystal rectifier to the resignation of its chief medical man and a sweeping re-examination of its policies.

The campaign, at first titled “Harnessing massive information,” was to possess centered on the cancer center’s analysis into the utilization of computer science in cancer treatment, per a leaflet on Memorial Sloan Kettering’s website.
The move follows a writing Thursday by The NY Times ANd ProPublica concerning an exclusive deal that Memorial Sloan applied scientist created with a man-made intelligence start-up to use digital pictures of twenty-five million tissue slides analyzed over decades. the corporate, Paige.AI, was based by 3 hospital insiders, and conjointly concerned investors UN agency were Memorial Sloan applied scientist board members.
Pathologists at the hospital complained that their work was being commercial for personal gain which patients weren't being conversant that pictures of their tissue slides were being shared with an out of doors company. The hospital and its officers aforesaid they did nothing wrong, however, acknowledged that they might have communicated higher.

Kenneth Manotti, the cancer center’s senior VP and chief development officer, created a relation to the article in AN email sent Fri to board members of the Society of MSK, the hospital’s volunteer fund-raising arm, ANd a related committee. It aforesaid the effort, which might have accelerated the center’s analysis on computer science, would be deferred “under this circumstances, as we have a tendency to navigate through the problems at hand.”
An interpreter for Memorial Sloan applied scientist aforesaid weekday that the Society of MSK would instead concentrate on patient care and would proceed. The society’s annual campaign generally raises funds starting from roughly $800,000 to $1 million for the hospital, she said. Overall, the society raised over $20 million a year for Memorial Sloan applied scientist, per its annual reports.
The amendment highlights the fund-raising challenges Janus-faced by Memorial Sloan applied scientist, that is one amongst the nation’s most prestigious cancer centers and recently completed a $3.5 billion multiyear fund-raising effort. Earlier this month, the hospital’s chief medical man, Dr. José Baselga, resigned under attack when a writing by the days and ProPublica unconcealed that he had did not disclose his intensive business ties in dozens of medical journal articles in recent years.
At conferences and in online forums, patients and employees members have expressed concern concerning the establishment and therefore the manner within which it interacts with the health and pharmaceutical industries. The hospital has proclaimed a task force to check its conflict-of-interest policies and aforesaid weekday during a note to the employees that it'd rent an out of doors business firm to conduct a “focused review” of any old considerations that had been raised internally. The leaders aforesaid they believed the considerations were while not advantage.
That uneasiness was mirrored at a employees meeting on Thursday once a pediatric brain doctor told the leaders that she was a bit embarrassed concerning the establishment despite the fact that she could be an interpreter for Cycle for Survival, a Memorial Sloan applied scientist charity that raises cash for analysis. She asked for a recommendation on a way to go, per many attendees.

Dr. Craig B. Thompson, the hospital’s chief govt, responded that it absolutely was necessary to concentrate on the cancer center’s dedication to treating cancer, together with the rare cancers that area unit the main target of Cycle for Survival, per the attendees. Cycle for Survival raised $39 million this year. The hospital interpreter, Christine Hickey, aforesaid the 2019 Cycle for Survival event was already planned and would proceed.
The fallout has crystal rectifier medical and tutorial consultants to imply tighter revealing rules on potential conflicts of interest within the cancer analysis fields and among major noncommercial organizations. Dr. Thompson and Dr. Lisa DeAngelis, acting physician-in-chief, acknowledged the problem of low morale in AN email to the employees on Monday.

“We and our board area unit terribly awake to the frustration and distress that several of you're experiencing when recent events at our center,” they aforesaid within the memorandum, that was obtained from hospital employees members. “We share these considerations and area unit deeply sorry that you simply feel upset. As your leaders, we have a tendency to acknowledge that nothing is a lot of necessary than maintaining the integrity and name of MSK and its employees.”
Fund-raising will quickly dampen once charities sustain a reputational hit, aforesaid Sophia Shaw, the co-founder and managing partner of fruit Advisors, that advises nonprofits. “They’re precisely like investors during a for-profit company,” Ms. Shaw aforesaid of donors. however, instead of expecting a come on investment, donors expect a come on the charity’s mission. “If the donor doesn’t feel that their cash is furthering that mission, then they might be reluctant to present it away at that point.”

Consultants for nonprofits aforesaid major donors were unlikely to be simply flustered by news reports, however, that would amendment betting on what happens next and the way the hospital responds.
“Individual funders — and conjointly foundations and companies — don’t like unhealthy news,” aforesaid Richard Mittenthal, president and chief govt of the TCC cluster, that advises nonprofits. “And once there’s unhealthy news, there’s continually a matter of — is there to any extent further unhealthy news?”

They Say Sexual Assault, Kavanaugh Says It Never Happened: Sifting Truth From Memory

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By BENEDICT CAREY and JAN HOFFMAN from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2xS2HKP

They Say Sexual Assault

Monday, 24 September 2018

Have You Encountered Candida Auris? We Want to Hear From You

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By Unknown Author from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2O5jcNP

Trial by Fire: Critics Demand That a Huge Sepsis Study Be Stopped

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By RONI CARYN RABIN from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2zpUGz1

Sunday, 23 September 2018

Tiny Device Is a ‘Huge Advance’ for Treatment of Severe Heart Failure

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By GINA KOLATA from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2PU59rI

Friday, 21 September 2018

The Couple Who Helped Decode Dyslexia

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By KATIE HAFNER from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2MUxGvk

Thursday, 20 September 2018

Biosafety Reforms Still Lagging at Military Labs

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By EMILY BAUMGAERTNER from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2Nw1XGh

Biosafety Reforms

Sloan Kettering’s Cozy Deal With Start-Up Ignites a New Uproar

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By CHARLES ORNSTEIN and KATIE THOMAS from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2MJMX29

‘Latent’ Tuberculosis? It’s Not That Common, Experts Find

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By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2PXc57J

Wednesday, 19 September 2018

Kidney Stones Are More Beautiful Than You Might Think

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By EMILY BAUMGAERTNER from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2MGgfyF

Kidney Stones

Monday, 17 September 2018

Justice Department Approves Cigna-Express Scripts Merger

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By REED ABELSON from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2xpFUpN

Justice Department

Sunday, 16 September 2018

Aspirin Late in Life? Healthy People May Not Need It

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By DENISE GRADY from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2NhzCDl

Aspirin Late in Life?

Where a Sore Throat Becomes a Death Sentence

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By DENISE GRADY from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2OnZKc3

Becomes a Death Sentence

Friday, 14 September 2018

Prominent Cancer Researcher Resigns from Dartmouth Amid Plagiarism Charges

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By BENEDICT CAREY from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2p8T2f0

Cancer Researcher Resigns

For Elderly Women with Breast Cancer, Surgery May Not Be the Best Option

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By PAULA SPAN from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2D4dTKa

Women with Breast Cancer

Thursday, 13 September 2018

Top Sloan Kettering Cancer Doctor Resigns After Failing to Disclose Industry Ties

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By KATIE THOMAS and CHARLES ORNSTEIN from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2p76vUS

Cancer Doctor Resigns

Wednesday, 12 September 2018

F.D.A. Cracks Down on Juul and E-Cigarette Retailers

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By SHEILA KAPLAN from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2x3jRG4

F.D.A. Cracks Down

Monday, 10 September 2018

Lasker Awards Given for Work in Genetics, Anesthesia and Promoting Women in Science

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By KATIE THOMAS from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2x2Xuzv

Lasker Awards Given for Work in Genetics

Most Doctors Are Ill-Equipped to Deal With the Opioid Epidemic. Few Medical Schools Teach Addiction.

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By JAN HOFFMAN from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2Qjcy4M

Most Doctors Are Ill-Equipped to Deal With the Opioid Epidemic

A Battle Plan for a War on Rare Diseases

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By KAREN WEINTRAUB from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2oU8DyV

Sunday, 9 September 2018

MSK Cancer Center Orders Staff to ‘Do a Better Job’ of Disclosing Industry Ties

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By KATIE THOMAS and CHARLES ORNSTEIN from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2oUDHyJ

MSK Cancer Center Orders Staff

Saturday, 8 September 2018

Top Cancer Researcher Fails to Disclose Corporate Financial Ties in Major Research Journals

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By CHARLES ORNSTEIN and KATIE THOMAS from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2MZdCgq

Doctor Top Cancer Researcher

Friday, 7 September 2018

Science Does Not Support Claims That Contraceptives Are ‘Abortion-Inducing’


By PAM BELLUCK from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2NYdSZA

Vaccines Against H.I.V., Malaria and Tuberculosis Unlikely, Study Says


By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2QbWAti

Wednesday, 5 September 2018

Another Case Is Threatening Obamacare. Democrats Hope It Will Help Them.

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By ABBY GOODNOUGH from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2NQWyW9

Theranos Is Shutting Down

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By REED ABELSON from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2NqoNhH

Tuesday, 4 September 2018

A New Lawsuit Threatens Obamacare. Here’s What’s at Stake and What to Expect in Oral Arguments

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By ABBY GOODNOUGH and JAN HOFFMAN from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2wK3Gw2

A New Lawsuit Threatens Obamacare

Scientists Are Retooling Bacteria to Cure Disease

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By manipulating desoxyribonucleic acid, researchers try to form microbes that, once eaten, work to treat a rare genetic condition — a milestone in artificial biology.
In a study dole out over the summer, a bunch of volunteers drank a white, peppermint-ish concoction laced with billions of bacterium. The microbes had been designed to interrupt down a present poison within the blood.

The overwhelming majority of folks will do that with none facilitate. except for those that cannot, these microbes might sometime become a living drug.

The trial marks a very important milestone in an exceedingly promising scientific field referred to as artificial biology. twenty years past, researchers began to tinker with living things the method engineers tinker with physical science.
They took advantage of the very fact that genes usually don’t add isolation. Instead, several genes work along, activating and deactivating each other. artificial biologists manipulated these communications, making cells that answer new signals or respond in new ways in which.

Until now, the largest impact has been industrial. firms area unit exploitation designed bacterium as miniature factories, grouping advanced molecules like antibiotics or compounds wont to create the cover.
In recent years, though, a variety of analysis groups have turned their attention inward. they require to USe artificial biology to fashion microbes that enter our bodies and treat us from the within.

The microorganism concoction that volunteers drank this summer — tested by the corporate Synlogic — might become the primary artificial biology-based medical treatment to realize approval by the Food and Drug Administration.
The bacterium area unit designed to treat a rare disease known as PKU or PKU. folks with the condition should avoid dietary supermolecule in foods like meat and cheese as a result of their bodies cannot break down a byproduct, AN aminoalkanoic acid known as an essential amino acid.

As essential amino acid builds up within the blood, it will harm neurons within the brain, resulting in delayed development, intellectual incapacity, and psychiatrical disorders. the standard treatment for an inborn error of metabolism could be a strict low-protein diet, among shakes loaded with organic process supplements.
But in experiments on mice and monkeys, Synology's bacterium showed promise as another treatment. On Tuesday, company investigators proclaimed positive ends up in a clinical test with healthy volunteers.

The researcher's area unit currently going forward with a shot on folks with an inborn error of metabolism and expect to report initial results next year.

Tal Danino, an artificial scientist at Columbia University, same that variety of different researchers area unit engaged on similar comes, however, nobody has captive forward as quick as Synlogic. “They’re leading the charge,” he said.

One of Synology's co-founders, James J. Collins, an artificial scientist at M.I.T., revealed one in all artificial biology’s initial proofs of principle in 2000.
He and his colleagues endowed E. coli bacterium with some way to show a cistron on and off after they were exposed to bound chemicals — “like a lightweight switch for genes,” Dr. Collins same in AN interview.
“I assume anyplace there area unit bacterium within the body is a chance to engineer them to try to to one thing else.”
At first, the scientist's unreal exploitation rewired bacterium as environmental sensors — maybe detection mobile biological weapons and manufacturing a chemical signal in response.

But then came the microbiome.

In the mid-2000s, microbiologists began charting our inner menagerie of microbes, the immense diversity of organisms that live within healthy folks. The microbiome is regularly completing advanced organic chemistry, a number of that helps protect the US from diseases, scientists found.
Synthetic biologists shortly began curiously whether or not they might add designed bacterium to the combination — may be as internal sensors for signs of illness, or perhaps as gut-based factories that create medication the body wants.

“You can’t overestimate the impact of the microbiome work,” same Jeff Hasty, a former student of Dr. Collins WHO currently runs his own laboratory at the University of Calif., San Diego. “That, in an exceeding shell, modified everything.”

Dr. Collins and Timothy K. Lu, another artificial scientist at M.I.T., co-founded Synlogic in 2013, and therefore the company began searching for diseases to require on. one in all their picks was the inborn error of metabolism, that affects sixteen,500 folks within u. s...

Drugs have recently become obtainable which will drive down levels of essential amino acid. however they solely add a fraction of patients, and that they associate with facet effects of their own.
“The current tools that we've obtainable don't seem to be adequate,” same Christine S. Brown, the manager director of the National inborn error of metabolism Alliance.

For years, researchers have explored treating inborn error of metabolism with cistron medical aid, hoping to insert operating versions of the defective cistron, called PAH, into a patient’s own cells. however, up to now, the approach has not captive on the far side studies in mice.
To Synlogic, an inborn error of metabolism appeared like a ripe chance to use artificial biology to form a treatment which may gain government approval.

Company researchers designated a harmless strain of E. coli that’s been studied for over a century. “Most folks have healthy, good E. coli in their viscus tracts,” same Paul Miller, the chief scientific officer of Synlogic.

The researchers inserted genes into the bacteria’s desoxyribonucleic acid in order that once they arrived within the gut, they may break down essential amino acid as our own cells do.
One of the new genes encodes a pump that the bacterium uses to suck up essential amino acid around them. A second cistron encodes AN catalyst that breaks down the essential amino acid into fragments. The bacterium then unleashes the fragments, that get washed go in the body waste.

The Synlogic team wished the microbes to interrupt down essential amino acid solely within the right place and at the proper time within the build. so that they designed the bacterium to stay their essential amino acid genes pack up if they perceived high levels of atomic number 8 around them.

Only when they arrived in an exceedingly place with very little atomic number 8 — the gut — did they activate their designed genes.
To test the bacterium, the researchers created mice with the mutation that causes the inborn error of metabolism. once the mice received a dose of the bacterium, the essential amino acid in their blood born by thirty-eight %, compared with mice while not the microbes.

Sunday, 2 September 2018

In the Latest Fight Against Ebola, Congo Seems to Be Winning

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By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. from NYT Health https://ift.tt/2PwaN3e